Healthy lifestyle, diet linked to slower memory decline

A woman kisses the cheek of an older woman who's cutting avocadosShare on Pinterest
A study found a link between healthy lifestyles and slower memory decline in older adults. Shestock/Getty Images
  • Researchers followed 29,072 older adults (60 years old and over) over 10 years to investigate the link between lifestyle choices and memory loss.
  • They found a link between a healthy lifestyle and slower memory decline, even in the presence of the APOE Ɛ4 gene, which is associated with Alzheimer’s disease.
  • The researchers hope their findings will inform public health initiatives seeking to prevent memory loss in older adults.

The gradual loss of thinking abilities such as memory, reasoning, and psychomotor speed is a natural part of aging. However, studies such as the FINGER clinical trial have shown that it is possible to prevent cognitive decline through lifestyle improvements.

The impact of lifestyle factors on memory has been the subject of many studies. However, previous research typically focused on a single lifestyle factor, such as diet, physical activity, smoking, or drinking. Understanding the combined effect of multiple lifestyle factors on memory decline is important.

For this reason, Dr. Jianping Jia, Ph.D., neurologist and professor at Capital Medical University, Beijing, China, and his colleagues investigated the combined effects of six lifestyle factors on memory decline in a large study population over a 10-year period.

In an interview with Medical News Today, Dr. Jia said:

“[E]ffective strategies for protecting against memory decline may benefit a large number of older adults. Our results showed that adherence to a combination of healthy lifestyle behaviours was associated with a slower memory decline in older adults, including those genetically susceptible to memory decline.”

The results of the study appear in the BMJ.

Dr. Richard J. Caselli, professor of neurology at the Mayo Clinic, who was not involved in the

Read More

Association between healthy lifestyle and memory decline in older adults: 10 year, population based, prospective cohort study

Abstract

Objective To identify an optimal lifestyle profile to protect against memory loss in older individuals.

Design Population based, prospective cohort study.

Setting Participants from areas representative of the north, south, and west of China.

Participants Individuals aged 60 years or older who had normal cognition and underwent apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotyping at baseline in 2009.

Main outcome measures Participants were followed up until death, discontinuation, or 26 December 2019. Six healthy lifestyle factors were assessed: a healthy diet (adherence to the recommended intake of at least 7 of 12 eligible food items), regular physical exercise (≥150 min of moderate intensity or ≥75 min of vigorous intensity, per week), active social contact (≥twice per week), active cognitive activity (≥twice per week), never or previously smoked, and never drinking alcohol. Participants were categorised into the favourable group if they had four to six healthy lifestyle factors, into the average group for two to three factors, and into the unfavourable group for zero to one factor. Memory function was assessed using the World Health Organization/University of California-Los Angeles Auditory Verbal Learning Test, and global cognition was assessed via the Mini-Mental State Examination. Linear mixed models were used to explore the impact of lifestyle factors on memory in the study sample.

Results 29 072 participants were included (mean age of 72.23 years; 48.54% (n=14 113) were women; and 20.43% (n=5939) were APOE ε4 carriers). Over the 10 year follow-up period (2009-19), participants in the favourable group had slower memory decline than those in the unfavourable group (by 0.028 points/year, 95% confidence interval 0.023 to 0.032, P<0.001). APOE ε4 carriers with favourable (0.027, 95% confidence interval 0.023 to 0.031) and average (0.014, 0.010 to 0.019) lifestyles exhibited a slower memory decline than those with unfavourable lifestyles. Among people who were not carriers of APOE

Read More

Study of older grown ups in China finds website link involving a healthier way of life and slower memory decline

A healthful life style, in specific a wholesome diet program, is linked with slower memory decline, finds a decade-lengthy analyze of more mature grownups in China, posted now in The BMJ.

Even for carriers of the apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene – the strongest identified chance factor for Alzheimer’s disorder and similar dementias – a healthful life style was identified to sluggish memory reduction.

Memory continuously declines as people age, but evidence from existing research is insufficient to evaluate the outcome of a healthier way of life on memory in later daily life. And given the numerous probable brings about of memory decline, a blend of nutritious behaviours may well be desired for an ideal outcome.

To take a look at this further more, researchers analysed knowledge from 29,000 grown ups aged at least 60 a long time (regular age 72 49% women) with standard cognitive perform who had been element of the China Cognition and Getting old Review.

At the start out of the study in 2009, memory perform was calculated applying the Auditory Verbal Studying exam (AVLT) and participants were analyzed for the APOE gene (20% were uncovered to be carriers). Adhere to-up assessments were being then done in excess of the following 10 a long time in 2012, 2014, 2016, and 2019.

A healthier way of living score combining 6 factors was then calculated: healthier diet program, common workout, energetic social make contact with (eg. observing buddies and spouse and children), cognitive activity (eg. crafting, studying, enjoying mahjong), non-cigarette smoking, and never drinking liquor.

Centered on their rating, ranging from to 6, individuals ended up set into favourable (4 to 6 healthy components), normal (2 to 3 balanced factors), or unfavourable ( to 1 healthful components) way of life teams and into APOE provider and non-provider teams.

Right

Read More