Raiders, Falcons trade grades: Bryan Edwards dealt to Atlanta as Vegas parts with wide receiver

After Bryan Edwards spent two years in Las Vegas, the Raiders have traded the receiver to the Falcons, the team announced. The Raiders traded Edwards along with a 2023 seventh-round pick to the Falcons in exchange for a fifth-round pick in next year’s draft, according to ESPN. 

A third-round pick in the 2020 NFL Draft, Edwards caught 45 passes for 764 yards and four touchdowns during his two seasons in Las Vegas. In 16 games last season, Edwards caught 34 of 59 targets for 571 yards and three touchdowns while averaging 16.8 yards per catch. He caught three passes for 41 yards in the Raiders’ wild card playoff loss to the Bengals. 

The 6-foot-3, 212-pound Edwards went over the 80-yard receiving barrier three times last season. He played an integral role in the Raiders’ playoff-clinching win over the Chargers in Week 18, as he caught four of five targets for 63 yards. 

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Edwards played collegiately at South Carolina, where over four seasons he caught 234 passes for 3,045 yards and 22 touchdowns. He also returned 12 punts while averaging 11.6 yards per return. 

Edwards joins a Falcons offense that includes rookie first-round pick Drake London, former Bengals receivers Auden Tate, veteran wideout Damiere Byrd and running back/receiver Cordarrelle Patterson. Edwards will reunite with quarterback Marcus Mariota, who served as Derek Carr’s backup in Las Vegas over the past two seasons. 

Here’s our initial grades for the trade that sent Edwards to Atlanta. 

Falcons: A- 

Edwards isn’t a star, but he is a young (he turns 24 in November) yet experienced player who should be entering his most productive seasons. He also adds depth to a Falcons receiving corps that is devoid of a big-name veteran wideout. Edwards’ experience with Mariota, along with the fact that he is still playing

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Why the Collegiate Esports Commissioner’s Cup is the latest move in Atlanta

Collegiate esports organization ESPORTSU has declared the Collegiate Esports Commissioner’s Cup (CECC), a scholastic esports event that will just take place in Atlanta from Might 6-8. The celebration signifies a partnership in between ESPORTSU and all of Atlanta’s significant esports organizations and is the most current shift in a drive for the town to turn into a hotbed of aggressive gaming.

ESPORTSU evp Angela Bernhard Thomas anticipates that the event will draw over 400 rivals, which she said will make the CECC the “largest celebration of collegiate esports ever.”

Learners from any U.S. two- or four-year college are invited to contend, as well as pupils from regional Atlanta high educational institutions.

“This is an celebration that is intended to unify,” Thomas reported. “To this issue, we have 11 different conferences competing in our celebration I do not imagine there’s ever been an esports party in which that was the situation.” 

The party highlights the bevy of significant-title esports orgs and gaming providers that have popped up in Atlanta in new a long time. In addition to the Overwatch League’s Atlanta Reign and the Simply call of Obligation League’s Atlanta FaZe — the two of which are administered by enterprise capital firm Atlanta Esports Ventures — the CECC consists of among its sponsors the Atlanta Hawks and its NBA 2K League staff the Hawks Talon, Atlanta-primarily based esports org Ghost Gaming and the*gameHERS, an on line gaming local community for girls.

Atlanta’s ascendance in esports is, to some extent, a make any difference of statistics. Immediately after all, Atlanta is the largest population center in the Deep South, building it a beneficial current market for brand names wanting to get to any kind of local community, gaming or if not. In any situation, the high selection of gaming organizations in Atlanta

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ESPORTSU unveils Collegiate Esports Commissioner’s Cup event in Atlanta

ESPORTSU, a collegiate esports brand owned by Collegiate Sports Management Team (CSMG), has unveiled facts for its inaugural Collegiate Esports Commissioner’s Cup (CECC) party.

Using position from Might 6th-8th at the Gateway Heart Arena in Atlanta, Ga, the occasion will see 64 groups contend across multiple titles which includes Overwatch and Rocket League. In addition to the tournaments., CECC 2022 will attribute a profession good and networking opportunities 

ESPORTSU
Impression credit score: ESPORTSU

Associated: Harena Knowledge and Amuka Esports associate to start Toronto collegiate esports league

In accordance to a release, CECC will be the ‘largest collegiate esports function ever’. Companions of the occasion include things like the Atlanta Hawks NBA staff, Skillshot Media, the Atlanta Esports Alliance and Contact of Responsibility League franchise Atlanta FaZe.

CECC 2022 will host competitions in Overwatch (Overwatch Collegiate Esports Commissioners Cup), Rocket League, NBA 2K, Super Smash Brothers Supreme and VALORANT. A career reasonable, professional networking chances, a Cosplay Costume Contest and stay music will also occur at the party. 

Angela Bernhard Thomas, EVP of ESPORTSU at CSMG, spoke about the event: “CECC is committed solely to the enhancement of collegiate esports and student-athletes, which we believe are the workforce and expertise of the long run.

“We will set learners centre phase to not only showcase their competitive abilities, but by alliances and partnerships with other sector leaders, produce an electric powered competition environment to rejoice them and all points gaming and esports.”

Related: CSMG officially launches esports manufacturer ESPORTSU

Learners on two and four-year courses are qualified to qualify as a result of regional invitational tournaments. In addition, coverage of the CECC will be broadcast on ESPORTSU’s Twitch channel and linear esports channel ESTV.

Todd Harris, CEO of Skillshot Media and Chair of the Atlanta Esports Alliance, also commented:

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Liberal sports writers look to cancel ‘Braves,’ Tomahawk Chop as World Series heads to Atlanta

Liberal sports writers and corporate media members will be glued to the television on Friday night when the Atlanta Braves host the Houston Astros in Game 3 of the World Series, but many of them won’t be focused on the game. 

Instead, woke members of the press have been busy decrying the Braves’ nickname and iconic Tomahawk Chop as everything from racist to an act of violence. 

“A sport that helped define America and American men for more than 100 years has been taken over by those who hate the sport, the fans and our country,” Media Research Center vice president Dan Gainor told Fox News Digital.  

Cancel culture has hit professional sports in recent years, specifically for teams named after Native Americans, and many have set their sights on the Atlanta Braves as the team hosts its first Fall Classic game in 22 years.

WITH MANFRED’S SUPPORT, BRAVES BRING CHOP TO WORLD SERIES

The NFL franchise formerly known as the Washington Redskins dropped its longtime moniker after years of pressure and have simply gone by the Washington Football Team. Major League Baseball’s Cleveland Indians initially ditched its popular Chief Wahoo logo and has scrapped the name altogether, planning to take the field as the Cleveland Guardians beginning next season. 

The Atlanta Braves, whose name goes back to 1912 when they played in Boston and later in Milwaukee, have hung onto the moniker and famed chant. Now, with the World Series heading to Atlanta’s Truist Park tied up at one game apiece, everyone seems to have an opinion on anything other than the action on the field.

The Associated Press published a column by Paul Newberry headlined, “Pull the plug on the chop — and Braves name, too.” The column admits the Tomahawk Chop “will be impossible to ignore now

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