Following heart-healthy lifestyle behaviors can support good brain health

The same risk factors that contribute to making heart disease the leading cause of death worldwide also impact the rising global prevalence of brain disease, including stroke, Alzheimer’s disease and dementia, according to the American Heart Association’s Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics -; 2022 Update, published today in the Association’s flagship, peer-reviewed journal Circulation.

Experts say maintaining a healthy weight, managing your blood pressure and following other heart-healthy lifestyle behaviors can also support good brain health.

Optimal brain health includes the functional ability to perform all the diverse tasks for which the brain is responsible, including movement, perception, learning and memory, communication, problem solving, judgment, decision making and emotion. Cognitive decline and dementia are often seen following stroke and cerebrovascular disease and indicate a decline in brain health. Conversely, studies show maintaining good vascular health is associated with healthy aging and retained cognitive function.

The global death rate from Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias is increasing considerably – even more than the rate of heart disease death:

  • Globally, more than 54 million people had Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias in 2020, that’s a 37% increase since 2010 and a 144% increase over the past 30 years (1990-2020).
  • More than 1.89 million deaths were attributed to Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias worldwide in 2020, compared to nearly 9 million deaths from heart disease.
  • Global deaths from Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias increased more than 44% from 2010 to 2020, compared to a 21% increase in deaths from heart disease.
  • Deaths from Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias increased 184% over the past 30 years (1990-2020), compared to a 66% increase in heart disease deaths during that same time.

Because prevalence and mortality data are tracked differently by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in the

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7 fantastic household workout routines to help you stay in good shape and sturdy

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With the 3rd wave and limits looming big, it’s back to working out at house. Presented the return of this pandemic uncertainty, it would be prudent to err on the side of caution and return to your residence health and fitness center or out of doors workout regime in buy to stay away from catching the dreaded virus in its hottest Omicron avatar. 

As it is, most people’s physical fitness routines have adjusted a lot due to the fact the start off of the pandemic. These times, it would just take just a slight adjustment to return to a hybrid kind of exercise routine. You could head out for runs, walks and rides and supplement all that with power education, yoga, stretching and mobility training indoors. Additionally, persons who earlier did not exercising due to the fact they uncovered likely to the gymnasium a chore, also turned to exercises thanks to the extra time they experienced though functioning from house. 

Also Read: Get suit this yr with a few wonderful property workouts

“The lockdown ushered in a modify in the way we strategy fitness… individuals have turn out to be much more centered on growing immunity amounts and prioritising their actual physical and psychological wellbeing. A area of persons that have not had the time to integrate a workout regime before are also now leveraging the benefit of at-residence routines to both get back again into physical fitness or get started their conditioning journeys,” suggests Naresh Krishnaswamy, expansion and advertising and marketing head, Cult In good shape. Therefore, a return to restrictions might be a blessing in disguise for those people who might have allow their training practice slip.  

So retaining that in thoughts, below are 7 workouts—some pure overall body bodyweight although some a mixture of cardio,

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Is Tea Good for Blood Pressure Health?

Hypertension (high blood pressure) means that blood flows through your arteries at higher-than-normal pressure. If left untreated, hypertension can cause complications such as heart disease, heart attack, and stroke.

Hypertension affects nearly half of adults in the United States. An estimated 47% of Americans have systolic blood pressure greater than 130 mmHg or diastolic blood pressure greater than 80 mmHg, or are taking medication for hypertension.

What Is Blood Pressure?

Systolic pressure: The pressure when the ventricles pump blood out of the heart

Diastolic pressure: The pressure between heartbeats when the heart is filling with blood

Hypertension is typically treated with heart-healthy lifestyle changes such as a healthy low-sodium diet and regular exercise. Medication to reduce blood pressure may also be needed.

Some people also use supplements and other natural remedies to help manage blood pressure. For instance, research suggests that certain teas, such as black tea and green tea, may help lower blood pressure.

This article will look at the science of how tea affects blood pressure, and how best to get the benefits.

Sarah Mason / Getty Images


What Are Catechins?

All tea comes from the Camellia sinensis plant. The level of leaf fermentation determines the type of tea:

  • White: Unfermented young buds
  • Green: Unfermented fully grown leaves
  • Oolong: Partially fermented
  • Black: Fully fermented
  • Pu-erh: Aged and fully fermented

Herbal teas are not considered true teas, because they are made from plants other than the Camellia sinensis plant.

The leaves of Camellia sinensis contain polyphenols that belong to the catechin family. These catechins are:

  • Epicatechin (EC)
  • Epigallocatechin (EGC)
  • Epicatechin gallate (ECG)
  • Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG)

These catechins have antioxidant properties. Antioxidants fight free radicals (molecules that cause oxidation from chemical reactions in the body). This helps prevent or delay cell damage and protect against inflammation.

White and green tea contain

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